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Learning to Shoot in My Basement

Posted By on April 26, 2015

Nate Basement SIRT Learning to Shoot in My Basement

By Nate Staskiewicz (14)

There are so many fundamentals that you have to learn before you can become good at shooting the pistol.  When I first started shooting, I would dry fire with my regular gun but would have to rack the slide every time and couldn’t see where the shot went. This didn’t allow me to understand good trigger control. I quickly got bored with dry fire until my Dad found the SIRT training pistol from Next Level Training.

Using the SIRT, he taught me how to shoot the handgun in my basement and it simplified learning trigger control. Two months later I competed in my first Steel Challenge. My two goals were to not get DQ’d and finish in the top 50% – I exceeded both of my goals and it was the beginning of my passion for shooting.

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SIRT Training Pistol

SIRT stands for Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger and it does just that. Unlike dry fire with a real pistol and having to rack the slide every time, the SIRT’s trigger resets automatically. The SIRT has two lasers – the first is a red laser that shows trigger prep, which is when you have pressure on the trigger. It also shows you if you are resetting the trigger without losing contact between rounds. The second laser is a green laser that shows where your round would have impacted and if you’re pulling the trigger too hard or anticipating the recoil. The SIRT has different settings that allow you to turn the red laser on or off.

SIRT NLT Logo

The SIRT pistol has a similar size, shape and feel of a Glock 17 and the same frame size of a Glock 34, which is the same pistol I use in competitions. You can even put your own sights on the SIRT. But the shape and size of the SIRT doesn’t matter – the important thing is to learn trigger control.

Effective Drills

The first thing I was taught when using a SIRT pistol is how to incorporate a safety protocol into drills. Even though it is impossible to load a round into a SIRT because the slide doesn’t move, we begin by removing all live firearms and ammunition from the room we are training in. This prevents any type of weapon confusion during a training session.

Nate gear When I first started training with the SIRT pistol I would stand in one spot and shoot at small targets on the wall until I understood trigger control. Then, once I got good at that I would incorporate the draw into the drills. Eventually, I would gradually incorporate more advanced things like shooting on the move, reloading and transitioning between different sized targets. While doing this, I have different sized targets to work on point shooting vs. sighted shooting.

Another way to train with the SIRT is to take it onto the live fire range and do drills with it before you do them with live fire so you can conserve ammo.

3-Gun Shooting

 IMG_1685 In my opinion, out of the pistol, rifle and shotgun, the pistol is definitely the hardest one for me to master. But because of the SIRT, it has made learning to shoot the pistol much easier.

As I started shooting in Steel Challenge, USPSA and 3-Gun matches, I have found my passion is with 3 Gun shooting and I’ve been traveling to regional 3-Gun competitions. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank my sponsors – Blade Tech, XRail by RCI, Taran Tactical Innovations, ESS, Targets Online, TACCOM and especially Mike Hughes of Next Level Training for providing me with a SIRT training pistol.

Next Level Training has generously offered a 15% discount code to junior shooters. Use the code “YOUTH” at checkout from the www.NextLevelTraining.com store for their SIRT Training Pistol and the SIRT AR Bolt.

CMP to Host JROTC National Championship at Camp Perry

Posted By on March 25, 2015

By: Ashley Brugone, CMP Writer__CMP LOGO - USE THIS ONE

CAMP PERRY, OH – The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) proudly invites the top junior shooters from around the country to Port Clinton to compete for the gold at the 2015 JROTC Three-Position National Championships, held March 19-21 at the Gary Anderson CMP Competition Briggs Center. High school cadets from Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force JROTC (Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) units will meet on the firing line to complete a journey that has been months in the making.

Over 8,025 junior shooters participated in the 2014-2015 CMP Postal Competition back in October 2014, with the highest-scoring shooters in each branch qualifying for the JROTC Regional Service Championships in February 2015. Top shooters and teams from each Regional location then earned a spot at the National Championship, where the overall winners will finally be determined.

KingGeorge The event is a 3×20 air rifle event, meaning competitors fire 20 record shots from three positions: prone, standing and kneeling. Visitors are welcome into the range to observe the National Championships at any time during the match – with free admission. All are encouraged to come witness this unparalleled display of young talent.

Larry and Brenda Potterfield of the MidwayUSA Foundation have donated over $400,000 through generous endowments to winning teams and individuals of the JROTC Championships. The MidwayUSA Foundation is a public charity that helps communities and organizations raise funds to support youth shooting teams and activities. 

Pratt The Gary Anderson CMP Competition Center is the completed result of the $1.1 million-dollar expansion to the formerly known CMP North Marksmanship Center, located inside Camp Perry in Port Clinton, OH. The expansion includes an open reception and common area, fully equipped classrooms, cylinder filling room and CMP retail store. The impressive addition also includes projection screens and flat-screen television sets throughout the building.

Connected to the new expansion is the existing 80-point air gun range, equipped with 10-meter firing points and state-of-the-art electronic targets to accommodate air rifle, air pistol or National Match Air Rifle shooting. The electronic targets, used in some of the most elite ranges in the world, update scores automatically and are displayed on large television monitors within the range – allowing spectators to keep track of the intense competition.

For those unable to attend the event, scores for the JROTC National Championship are also available for viewing online through the CMP website.TopComp

For more information on the JROTC National Championship and a link to live target images, visit http://thecmp.org/air/jrotc-air-rifle-national-championship/.jrotc 4-3

For more information about the CMP and its programs, log onto www.TheCMP.org for more information and program descriptions.

 

ACUI Donates to Collegiate Shooting Team Endowment Accounts

Posted By on March 4, 2015

GA-2015-Emmanuel College - ACUI Lower East Champions Action ACUI Donates to Collegiate Shooting Team Endowment Accounts

Columbia, MO The Association of College Unions International has made a donation of $93,250 to the MidwayUSA Foundation’s Team Endowment Account Program.  Teams that will benefit from this donation recently competed in two ACUI Collegiate Clay Target Championship events.  Both events were held in January.

Michelle Smith, ACUI Director of Corporate Partnerships and Events, said, “As always, we thank the MidwayUSA Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. [Larry] Potterfield for supporting the ACUI Shotgun Bowl Series and Collegiate Clay Target Championships. They are helping make our program a success.”  Currently, over 300 collegiate shooting teams have an active Team Endowment Account.

GA-2015-Emmanuel College - ACUI Lower East Champions Along with donations like this one, teams can grow their Team Endowment Account through soliciting private donations, earnings, and conducting fundraisers. Funds generated through private donations and fundraisers are currently matched 1:1 through November 30, 2015.   Each year teams can then apply to draw up to 5% of their account balance to use for team expenses, such as, ammunition, range fees, targets, uniforms, travel and more.

Learn more about the MidwayUSA Foundation and its Team Endowment Account Program by visiting www.midwayusafoundation.orgor calling 1-877-375-4570.  To learn more about the Association of College Unions International visit www.acui.org/claytargets.


Dani Farris
Marketing Communications Specialist | NRA Annual Member
dfarris@midwayusafoundation.org | 573-447-5994
6001 West Van Horn Tavern Rd. Ste C | Columbia, MO 65203
www.midwayusafoundation.org

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Brownells ESG Essentials Emergency Gun Bag Kit

Posted By on February 22, 2015

Many of us have an emergency bag in case of a disaster. Is is a real must for any family, especially a family with kids. One of the best I have seen is Brownells ESG Essentials Kit. It has just about everything you need in any situation except food and water – just add them in. The Emergency Gun Bag contains the supplies required to help keep both you and your firearm working in an emergency situation, all packaged into one easy-to-carry bag that saves you money over purchasing all the items separately.

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For your gun, the bag contains a Universal Cleaning Kit, weapon wipes, two 20-round AR-15 magazines, and a Burris lens pen to keep your optic clean. Just add some ammunition in the appropriate caliber.
For you, the bag contains everything – except food – that’s required to survive a long-term emergency: Water purification, fire-making supplies, shelter-building tools and materials, first-aid supplies, emergency lighting and more.
Just add some long-term storage food and ammo in the caliber of your choice, and you’ve got a completely-prepared bag that you can grab and go with in any emergency. Check it out at www.brownells.com.

Kit Includes:

· Remington Universal Cleaning Kit

· Break-Free Weapon Wipes, 24-Pack

· Ontario Survival Knife

· Burris Lens Pen

· 2 Brownells 20-Round Magazines

· ASP Airweight Baton

· Top Cop .68 oz Spray

· E.A.R. Ultra-Fit Earplugs, Corded w/Case

· Brownells Clear Shooting Glasses

· Gerber Dime Multi-Tool

· Gerber Gator Machete Jr.

· Brownells Versatile Light

· Streamlight Microlight

· Streamlight Trident Headlamp

· Adventure Medical Adventure Trauma Pack

· Adventure Medical Kits Afterbite

· Brownells AR Multitasker

· Ace Camp Survival Multi-Tool Shovel

· Condor Outdoors Products Black Shemagh

· Coleman Lightsticks, 2-pack

· Coleman Emergency Candles, 2-pack

· Turboflame V Flame

· UST Butane Fuel

· Balm Shot

· Stansport Camp Blanket

· Rite In The Rain Notebook

· Rite In The Rain Pen

· LifeStraw Filter

· CamelBak Eddy Hydration Bottle

· Coleman Campers Toilet Paper

· Adventure Medical Kits Adventure Bath Wipes, Travel Size

· Midland Pocket Radio

· Duracell Pro Cell AAA Batteries

· SureFire 123 6-pack Batteries

· Voodoo Tactical 50-ft Paracord

· SOL Fire Lite Kit

· Condor Outdoor Products 3-Day Assault Pack

· ESG Essentials Patch

Happy 2015! Remember Safety First – Check Out Custom Safety Flags

Posted By on January 4, 2015

 IMG_4542 edited Website jpg I hope you all have a very happy and rewarding new year. Lots of fun, some great shooting and time with family. Always keep in mind that safety comes first whenever you are around firearms whether it is at the range or at home.

When safety rules are broken disasters can happen! We should make sure that standard safety rules are adhered to when handling firearms. Such rules include:

  • Always treat a firearm as if it was loaded.
  • The gun is always loaded. (If you always treat a firearm as if it was loaded, then when handling a firearm you will be more inclined to insure the muzzle is not pointed at anyone, including yourself.)
  • Never point a gun at anyone. (Muzzle control at all times.)
  • Always know your target and what is behind it. (The gun is pointed down-range and when fired the bullet cannot go beyond the berm/barrier. If it does, there is still a cleared area.)
  • When these rules are followed, it will minimize any damage if an accidental discharge occurs insuring your safety and that of others. However, the use of a chamber safety flag will further reduce accidents, hopefully eliminating them.

Almost all firearms sold by manufacturers today are sold with a safety flag. That is encouraging. The discouraging part is that these flags are usually not used and many are lost. Safety flags should be used all of the time unless actually shooting.

  • When stored. When you take a firearm out of the safe to show someone, put it in a gun case, or clean it, you can immediately see the flag and know it is safe.
  • When put in the gun case. (When a gun is taken out of the case there should be a flag in the chamber.)
  • At the range. A chamber safety flag should be inserted into the chamber immediately after shooting. This means that long guns (rifles and shotguns) should have a safety flag in them when they are in the rack.

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Some really cool safety flags are custom ones for rifle and shotgun that are available from Sterling White.

Personalized Safety Flags – Making safety flags “cool” is a great incentive for people to use them. Not only are they personalized and look good but they work extremely well and are very obvious. We have used them extensively with great success. Junior Shooters magazine is a huge proponent of using safety flags. These flags from Sterling White are fully functional and the large fabric that is personalized really stands out. They are effective and fun. They are also “Way Cool!” Contact: Sterling White CONTACT INFO: http://www.plugrusa.com 951-966-9841.

Flex Hone – Improving Your Shotgun

Posted By on December 9, 2014

Flexhone_Barrel_Honeswcap We have found that even a chrome barrel and chamber have problems with sticky shells or shell residue build up, even after cleaning. When you put 400-500 rounds through your shotgun in a three-day period this can cause minor difficulties and even affect accuracy. There is now an easy way to make your chamber, forcing cone, and barrel as smooth as silk making those shells pop right out. We have even used it with Antique shotguns cleaning out rust and smoothing out pits.

This is a flexible, drill-mounted hone called the Flex-Hone® to quickly and easily produce the optimum smooth and polished surface finish in any type or size of shotgun chamber, barrel, or forcing cone.

Developed by Brush Research Manufacturing (BRM), Los Angeles, CA, the ball-style Flex-Hone Tool is characterized by small, abrasive globules permanently mounted to flexible nylon filaments. Using a flexible hone is a simple process that basically requires the means to hold a part securely such as a padded vise, the use of a low speed electric hand drill, and some common sense.

Available in a variety of lengths and grits designed to meet the various bore or gauge sizes of most types of guns, the Flex-Hone enables shotgun owners to achieve a rust-free, beautifully polished micro surface finish. As a result, many firearm manufacturers are today selecting the Flex-Hone for final finishing operations. However, the tool functions just as well in the hands of a DIYer.

Maintaining Barrels, Chambers and Force Cones
The Flex-Hone quickly, safely and thoroughly cleans out any barrel damage that has occurred from oxidation and corrosion, blend out scratches and removes the nicks and pits that cause plastic adhesion.

A flexible hone will also remove the built up residue in a barrel, and leave a superior surface resulting in greater accuracy, reduced wear and longer life for a shotgun. Standard barrel hones are 34 inches long and available in 10-, 12-, 16- and 20-gauge sizes.

Shotgun honing system 1 When used in shotgun chambers, the polished finish allows fired cases to extract more easily, which puts less strain on extractors and ejectors. It will also ensure that debris is far less likely to adhere to the chamber walls and any that does remain will be much easier to remove during the normal cleaning procedure.

The forcing cone can also be polished using a flexible hone with a specially designed tapered profile Flex-Hone. Forcing cones are the first thing the shot and wadding encounter as the transition is made from chamber to barrel, the cone literally forcing the larger diameter payload down to barrel size, so it is subjected to considerable force, as its name implies.

This can lead to considerable fouling build-up close to the cone, the surface finish of which can be less smooth than either the barrel or chamber, as manufactured. Not only does the fouling create added resistance but can induce corrosion to take hold under it. Even regular cleaning may not remove it all. Honing with the Flex-Hone will ensure fouling build up is minimized.

Shotgun Owner Feedback

Johnson, who had been utilizing professional services for polishing and finishing and paying the cost plus $75 in postage, tried the Flex-Hone.

“With the Flex-Hone, I accomplished the polishing myself in half an hour,” says Johnson. “This saved me time and money. If you can operate a drill you can polish your barrels, chambers, forcing cones and cylinders yourself. I followed the instructions and had no problems at all.”

Jim O’Hanlon, a cowboy action shooter form Port St. Lucie, FL had similar results.

“Using the Flex Hone simplified the cleaning process and gave more consistent results,” says O’Hanlon. “As a cowboy action shooter, we shoot double shotguns that are not allowed to have ejectors, just extractors. Shells must fall out of the chambers with ease for fast reloads.”

Hanlon adds that he also competes in Black Powder categories, which can create what he calls “a really sticky chamber.”

“The Flex Hone gives that final, glass like smoothness that allows my extraction of empty shells to be fast,” says Hanlon.

Art Kopp, Jr. of Great Bend, PA tells of shell-hanging problems occurring with his Remington 1187 20-gauge. “The shells were not ejecting,” explains Kopp. To determine if the issue was a barrel-related malfunction Kopp switched barrels with another 20 gauge and the problem disappeared immediately.

Knowing it was a barrel issue, Kopp was able to use the Flex-Hone at home. “I used an electric drill, elbow grease, and a Flex-Hone,” says Kopp. “After, my Remington 1187 Premier Upland Special was again working flawlessly with any rounds I put through it, including cheap aluminum-hulled ones.”

Flexhone-Firearms_Barrelswcap Shotgun Barrel Restoration

Delbert Murray of Victorian Arms of Pensacola, FL describes how frustrating it can be to clean the barrels of older shotgun barrels, included double-barreled.

“We seem to have a lot of people showing up over the last two years with Grandpa’s old double barrel,” explains Murray of Victorian Arms. “Some of these were very sad cases. We did what we could for the pitted barrels [using various techniques] and it was relatively easy to knock off the surface rust and chunks of hardened powder and residue. The disappointing part was the very minute pits and scratches that remained.”

Although eager to restore the barrels to a safe condition to shoot, Murray also understood that it was extremely important that excessive material was not removed and that no area was over-worked in an attempt to remove a particularly stubborn pit or rust. Having tried a myriad of techniques, Murray learned of the Flex-Hone and decided to put it to the test.

“We were a little skeptical at first about how well it could work and chose an old Colt double 12Ga of Damascus steel to test on,” says Murray. “It could never be fired again so we couldn’t do it any harm.”

Murray was instantly impressed with the results. “The Flex-Hone was like magic. Now we use them every chance we get and the result is almost always a bright, ‘like new’ barrel in just a matter of minutes.

Victorian Arms now stocks a complete set of Flex-Hones in various sizes for all shotgun gauges, as well as for the chambers.

“It pays for itself the first time it is used on a restoration job,” says Murray.

Dennis Weinman, of Cordova AK, had a similar experience using the Flex-Hone as part of a restoration of his 1870’s vintage W.C. Scott.

“Rusty bores were a major issue,” explains Weinman. “The Flex-Hone tool removed the surface rust completely from the bores. I would have paid a professional gunsmith good money to do what I did myself. I used the flexible hone with my old drill and motor oil and got a great result.”

Weinman was also impressed that the Flex-Hone was available in the exact bore size he needed.

“The shotgun was a 10 gauge bore, so the fact that [Brush Research] had a 10 gauge Flex Hone was a restoration life saver,” says Weinman. “Moreover, it was rewarding to do the work myself and it made the result even better.”

For more information, contact Brush Research Manufacturing, Brush Research Mfg. Co., Inc., 4642 Floral Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90022; Phone: (323) 261-2193; Fax: (323) 268-6587; e-mail: info@brushresearch.com or visit the web site: www.brushresearch.com

For a simple Flex-Hone for Firearms Instructional Video go to our YouTube page. http://www.youtube.com/BrushResearch

Hodgdon’s 2015 Reloading Manual

Posted By on December 4, 2014

This is a “Must Have” for reloaders! It is brand new and updated. Contact them to get yours.

AM2015COVER

  • Hodgdon-The Brand that’s True
  • Pyrodex-The Muzzleloading Propellant
  • Triple Se7en-Easy Clean Muzzleloading Propellant
  • GOEX Black Powder-The Tradition Continues
  • IMR-Legendary Powders
  • IMR White Hots Preformed Charges
  • Winchester Smokeless Propellant-For Loading Professionals
  • VihtaVuori Smokeless Powders

6430 Vista Drive

Shawnee, KS 66218

www.hodgdon.com

(913)745-0778 Office direct

(913)362-1307 Fax

Office hours 7a-5:30p Mon-Thurs CST Closed Fridays

Do You Want To Go Shooting?

Posted By on November 24, 2014

Do You Want to go Shooting Vol 19 P8-10_Page_1Do You Want to go Shooting Vol 19 P8-10_Page_2 

Do You Want to go Shooting Vol 19 P8-10_Page_3

Be The Best Airgunner You Can Be!

Posted By on November 20, 2014

AmerAirgunner_logo_rgb FORT SMITH, AR (November 17th, 2014)— Are you the best shot you can be with your air rifle? Tune in for this week’s Round Table where Rossi Morreale, Jim Chapman, Tom Gaylord, and Rick Eutsler provide expert tips that help you improve your shooting skills.

Rossi also gives us an insider’s look at the largest online airgun retailer on the planet—Pyramyd Air. Airgun critic, Rick Eutsler and Rossi get together to evaluate the popular Umarex Surge and see the kind of airgun performance tests that are often performed for airgun reviews.

 QuadPicAmerican Airgunner airs on the Pursuit Channel Wednesdays at 4:30 pm Eastern, Fridays at 1:30 am and during primetime Friday evening at 8:30 pm Eastern. This is the only televised show about airguns. Watch it on DirectTV Ch. 604 or DISH Network Ch. 393. Check your local listings for additional channel information.

Follow American Airgunner on Facebook for information about weekly giveaways through the rest of this year and tune in for the weekly Get Clued In Contest from Pyramyd Air. Watch for the clue during the show’s airing on Pursuit Channel. For more information and to enter go to http://www.PyramydAir.com/win.

Find American Airgunner on Facebook, YouTube, , and Twitter.

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Browning Buckmark Plus UDX

Posted By on November 9, 2014

By: Ashley Rumble (11) Volume 16 Winter 2013

closeup gripI recently got a chance to test a Browning Buck Mark.  It is a very cool gun and really nice to shoot. It has a match trigger that is very short and crisp. It has a chrome barrel and wooden grips. The green bead of the front sight makes the sight picture very clear when looking through it. When I shoot it, I do very well with it, and it has become my favorite gun.
When I first got it, I had never shot anything but my dad’s Smith and Wesson 22A; which although is a very good, inexpensive, baseline pistol, was very touchy on what ammo went through it. The Browning ran without a flaw. The slide was very easy to pull, though I had trouble with jams because of my noodle arms. My dad got to shoot it before I did, and he said it was like “breaking a glass rod” when you pulled the trigger.
Ashley holding browning silhouette It is very accurate and works well if you are really into competing with a .22 in steel challenge, Ruger Rimfire, or bullseye.  It’s a good beginner’s gun for people who aren’t used to guns or need a gun that’s easy to shoot and easy to take care of.  It is so fun to shoot and easy to clean. When cleaning the Smith and Wesson, it took us a long time because the recoil spring would suddenly pop out and we would have to move it back into place. When I first shot the Browning in a match, I was able to achieve faster times than I did with the Smith and Wesson.
It’s lighter than some of the other handguns I have tried which makes it good for younger kids or people just starting. For people who don’t like a lot of kick, it’s great.  While loading the magazines themselves is very easy, sometimes it takes a little extra pushing power to get the magazine seated properly.  I used this gun in my last competition, and it was easy to handle, even though some of the targets were at a challenging distance for a pistol.   It has a crowned barrel which makes it better because the crown helps keep the bullet in a tight spin and protects the rifling at the end of the barrel, making it much more accurate. Packing it around is easy as well. It’s very compact so we have no trouble getting it in the bag. I really hope I can get one of my own soon. It’s a great gun, and if you ever get an opportunity to shoot one, you should!

SAFETY: Peacemaker versus Vaquerro

Posted By on November 3, 2014

By: Larry Haley from Volume 16 Winter 2013

 Rear of frame for firing pin Since the beginning of this magazine there has been at least one article on safety. Safety is something we can never forget or push to the background if we are to enjoy our shooting sports and enjoy them without incidents. Previous articles have described situations that we would not think would happen, but they do and did.

We have discussed the major firearm safety rules many times. Another aspect of firearm safety is to be very knowledgeable about each firearm you handle. There can be minor differences between two firearms that look much the same, that have big safety considerations. For example, let’s look at the famous Colt Peacemaker, the “six-gun”, and compare it to the modern Ruger Vaquero.

(Picture of each gun from the same side) The Peacemaker is on the left and the Vaquero is on the right. They look very similar and have similar features. They both hold six cartridges and are both single action, meaning you have to pull the hammer back first and then pull the trigger to fire.

Now let’s look at them when they are fully cocked.

(Picture of each gun cocked, maybe close up at rear area)

Do you notice anything different about them? Look closely at the hammer on each one. The Peacemaker’s hammer has a pointed part on it. That is the firing pin. The Vaquero hammer is flat. It doesn’t have a firing pin on it. If you remember, the firing pin is the part of the firearm that strikes the primer on the cartridge causing the gun to fire.

So how does the Vaquero work without a firing pin? Well, it does have a firing pin, but it’s built into the gun between the hammer and the cartridge. So why did they build it that way? There are two major reasons. The first is that the firing pin on the Peacemaker can be broken off, making it unable to fire. So the Vaquero doesn’t have that problem. The second is that it makes the Vaquero safer, and that is what we are interested in.

The firing pin mechanism on the Vaquero is called a transfer bar and from that we get the term transfer bar safety. The transfer bar moves up and down. It is down, safe, most of the time. It only moves up and in-between the hammer and the cartridge when the trigger is pulled. Okay, why does that make it safer?Safety P VS V

To answer that, let’s first look closer at the Peacemaker. Since we don’t have the space in this article for a lot of pictures I will try to explain it. When a Peacemaker is cocked the chamber rotates and a new cartridge is lined up with the barrel. When the trigger is pulled, the hammer moves forward and its firing pin fits through a small hole allowing it to hit the cartridge. It then fires.

This firing pin, which is long enough to hit the cartridge, is also long enough that if the firearm is loaded with six cartridges and the hammer is down, it is resting on the primer of a cartridge. Any kind of a hit on the hammer, or the gun being dropped, could cause the gun to fire. Thus the standard safety rule for the Peacemaker is to only load five cartridges and make sure the hammer is down on the empty one.

The Vaquero does not have this issue. Since the trigger has to be pulled for the firing pin to be lined up between the hammer and the cartridge, the gun can’t fire when the hammer is down, making it much safer. Because of this, the Vaquero can be safely loaded with six cartridges, a true “six-shooter.”

If you can, find someone who has these firearms, and can handle them safely, to show them to you so you can better see what is described above.

Okay, now for some fun. Do you want to be a western film and TV critic? Watch some shows. Pay close attention to any Peacemaker handling. You can ignore the fact that in the old movies they seem to shoot about 20 times without reloading, everybody knows that one.

Here’s what to watch for: A cowboy, gunslinger, or whoever, pulls his gun, cocks it, and then doesn’t fire it and lets the hammer back down and puts it back in the holster. What did they just do? You’re right; they now have the firing pin resting on the primer of the unfired cartridge. It could fire with a bump on the hammer or some other jarring motion. Explain that to your friends. You are now the Gunslinger Guru.

So remember, each type of firearm has its own level of safety and some that look similar may operate differently. You need to become familiar with any firearm before you use it. I recommend that you ask someone who is familiar with a firearm to explain how it works before you attempt to load or shoot it.

Be safe, have fun.

American Airgunner on TV and Internet

Posted By on October 9, 2014

If you like hunting and like airguns you neec to see this show. Sponsored by Umarex, one of the best producers of airguns, the show is interesting, comprehensive and entertaining. This week they just had The History of Airguns .

Screen Shot 2014-10-06 at 8.44.52 AM FORT SMITH, AR (October 6th, 2014)— This week on American Airgunner, host Rossi Morreale is joined at the Round Table by Tom Gaylord, Jim Chapman, and Steve Fjestad to talk about some of the history surrounding airguns.

As a long-time writer and blogger, Tom Gaylord—also known as the Godfather of Airguns—brings a wealth of knowledge to the table from information about the first known airguns, to their current growing popularity in the United States. Jim Chapman is well versed on the traditions of hunting with airguns and Steve Fjestad is the publisher of the Blue Book of Airguns and offers unique knowledge of airguns in America.

DSC_7998 In this episode’s Airgun Review, Rick Eutsler shares his knowledge with Rossi about the Umarex Octane, a powerful break barrel air rifle. In the Airgun Hunting segment Jim Chapman is hunting with an airgun in pursuit of a javelina in Arizona.

American Airgunner airs on Wednesdays at 4:30 pm Eastern, Fridays at 1:30 am and during primetime on Friday evening at 8:30 pm Eastern. Pursuit Channel can be found on DirectTV Ch. 604, and DISH Network Ch. 393. Check your local listings for additional channel information.

Audiences are invited to follow American Airgunner on Facebook, YouTube, , and to search for #AirgunnerTV to keep up with the show, its host Rossi Morreale, and the show’s guests, airgun hunters, and experts.

Screen Shot 2014-10-06 at 8.45.54 AM http://www.Facebook.com/AmericanAirgunner
http://www.YouTube.com/AmericanAirgunner
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http://www.Twitter.com/#AirgunnerTV

Justin “JB” Biddle
Executive Producer
American Airgunner
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